glowe-job:

 
Education is the kindling of a flame, not the filling of a vessel.
Socrates  (via loveage-moondream)

(Source: observando, via thedanksideofthemoon)

White slaves masters raped black women and turned their backs on their offspring. They are the original dead beat dads.

(via ablackgirlintheworld)

can you say Thomas Jefferson and everyone of his co signers of the declaration of so called independence. yeah independence for who ?

(via ausetkmt)

Not so fun fact: those signers were so hounded by the fact that they kept slaves that many of them bent over backwards to justify keeping slaves, including pointing out cranial structures and cultural differences. They were claiming black people to be subhuman so that they could claim they wanted freedom while still keeping slaves.

(via crowvo)

Fetishizers and racists love to argue that if you find someone sexually attractive, aesthetically pleasing, or have lust for them; you “are not racist”.

Quite the contrary, lusting someone because of a fetish means that you do not see them as human; merely a play you for your sexual fantasies. It is dehumanizing. The object of lust can easily be replaced by anyone who looks similar and their happiness is not needed as long as yours it guaranteed.

Usually when people ask how a racist can have sex with someone of another race I use this very example of the slave/master complex.

-Susie the moderator

(via fucknofetishization)

And for all those who think that a biracial society will lead to an end of racism.  

(via afroetry)

(via afroetry)

faderstyle:

MALE SUPERMODEL SHAUN ROSS TALKS BEAUTY STANDARDS AND GROWING UP ALBINO
theonion:

FBI Uncovers Al-Qaeda Plot To Just Sit Back And Enjoy Collapse Of United States
mucholderthen:

The Volcano That Changed the Course of HistoryTAMBORA ERUPTION CAUSED NOT ONLY THE YEAR WITHOUT A SUMMER, BUT LED TO CHOLERA, OPIUM, FAMINE, AND ARCTIC EXPLORATION

The floods, droughts, starvation, and disease in the three years following the 1815 eruption stem from the volcano’s effects on weather systems, so Tambora stands today as a harrowing case study of what the human costs and global reach might be from runaway climate change.

 Slate // APRIL 9 2014 (originally appeared in The Conversation)By Gillen D’Arcy Wood

Most have heard of the Battle of Waterloo, but who has heard of the volcano called Tambora? No school textbook I’ve seen mentions that only two months before Napoleon’s final defeat in 1815, the faraway Indonesian island of Sumbawa was the site of the most devastating volcanic eruption on Earth in thousands of years.
The death toll was around 100,000 people from the thick pyroclastic flows of lava; the tsunami that struck nearby coasts; and the thick ash that blanketed Southeast Asia’s farmlands, destroyed crops, and plunged it into darkness for a week.
Both events—Napoleon’s defeat and the eruption—had monumental impacts on human history. But while a library of scholarship has been devoted to Napoleon’s undoing at Waterloo, the scattered writings on Tambora would scarcely fill your in-tray.


It is time to recognize Tambora as the Napoleon of eruptions. The implications—for historians—of a revised, volcanic 19th century are immense. As with the global cholera epidemic, and the growth of a Chinese opium empire, Victorian-era polar exploration might not have happened at all, or would have evolved in an entirely different direction, had it not been for Tambora’s climate-wrecking detonation in 1815.
For two long centuries, the connections between this major volcanic disaster and human history have been obscured by two factors: the limitations of scientific knowledge, and by our narrow, anthropocentric vision that seeks out only human causes for human events, neglecting the influence of environmental change. Now, in the 21st century, as we begin to appreciate more profoundly the interdependence of human and natural systems, the lesson of a 200-year-old climate emergency may finally be learned: A changing climate changes everything.

Continue reading at Slate …
Gillen D’Arcy Wood is Director of Sustainability Studies Initiative in the Humanities and Professor of English at the University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign.  He is the author of Tambora: the Eruption that Changed the World, Princeton University Press (April 27, 2014; although Amazon claims April 13 shipping).
For more on Tambora, check out this post …
burnsideboyz:

PRINCE